Tag Archives: poem

henceforth

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a cinquain.

these hands
sow these letters
on your humus tongue so
opulently words will burgeon
henceforth

slush, slosh

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a sonnet – in the Italian (Petrarchan) style. Continue reading

bologna

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a rondel. Listen to the audio for an important clue on how this is intended to be read. Continue reading

contextual

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a glosa, which is a form that bases itself on a quote from an existing poem. I’m basing this one on a snippet from “Language Is a Virus,” by Laurie Anderson.

Paradise
is exactly like
where you are right now
only much, much better.
—“Language Is a Virus,” Laurie Anderson

Continue reading

thigmotropism

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a ghazal of sorts.

Thigmotropism, which has the stress on the second syllable, names the property of moving in response to touch: turning towards or away from a thing upon coming into contact with it. It’s often described in plants, but of course happens in more mobile entities as well. Continue reading

tregetour

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a roundel.

A tregetour is a trickster, a conjurer, a juggler; the word comes by way of French from Latin trans ‘across’ plus jactare ‘throw’, the same source as trajectory. And gnidge is a rare word from Scottish meaning ‘rub, squeeze, press’. Continue reading

ultracrepidarian

This year, I’m writing poetry for every word tasting in November. I’m calling it Povember. Today, a rondeau redoubled.

An ultracrepidarian, by the way, is someone who offers opinions on matters beyond their expertise. Literally, it’s someone who goes beyond matters of shoemaking. It’s a reference to an anecdote about the Greek painter Apelles: a shoemaker corrected him on details of a shoe, and Apelles fixed the painting; the shoemaker, emboldened, offered opinions on the leg, and Apelles advised him not to go beyond the shoes. Continue reading