Tag Archives: Pronunciation Tip

Pronunciation tip: Riesling and Gewürztraminer

Summer is here, and the time is right for drinking white wines with German names. I’m not going to bother with Sylvaner or Müller-Thurgau because anyone who actually says those is usually close enough. But not everyone is sure how to say Riesling or Gewürztraminer. So I’ll give you the standard German way and the usual English way of pronouncing them.

Pronunciation tip: Sauvignon

You probably know how to say sauvignon, though every so often I hear someone who doesn’t. But do you know why there are two very different wine grape varieties with it in their names (Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc) and why in French plus equals o?

Pronunciation tip: Calgary

You might think that Calgary would be a straightforward thing to say. Well, you can say it as you see it and be understood, yes, but the odds are pretty good you’ll immediately sound like someone not from around Calgary. Here’s a quick tip – less than a minute – on how Calgarians say it.

Pronunciation tip: Łódź

My latest pronunciation tip lets you in on a couple of things in Polish you’ve probably wondered about. Now you’ll know how to pronounce the name of the city Łódź – and Wrocław and Kraków, while you’re at it. And as an added bonus you’ll know why is called “double u” instead of “double v.”

Pronunciation tip: Aalborg and Aarhus

Last time around, I talked about Å. Well, in Denmark, å used to be written as aa and still shows up that way in some place names sometimes. And I’m sure people have occasionally wondered about how to say Aalborg and Aarhus. Thing is, I’ve been avoiding talking about Danish. The Danish language is… well, you’ll see…

Pronunciation tip: Å

My latest pronunciation tip is on the name of a place (several places, really) and a letter:

Pronunciation tip: São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro

Learning to pronounce Portuguese – and especially Brazilian Portuguese – is straightforward: Whatever you think it should be, it isn’t, and whenever you try to say something, you’ll make a mistake.

OK, that’s a slight overstatement, but only slight. The odds are good that for a long time you won’t be able to get through a sentence without slipping up. That’s because it looks like Spanish with maybe bits of French or Italian, but it’s not like any of them. I’m not going to try to get you pronouncing it all smoothly, but I can start you with the two Brazilian place names you’re most likely to want to say. Ready?